Political Science / International Relations / Diplomacy

Total 7 results found.

The Political Economy of Transitions to Peace

The Political Economy of Transitions to Peace

A Comparative Perspective

How is peace actually achieved, reinforced, and made permanent? This is the question that this book tackles as the author examines the outcomes of a series of conflicts in the Middle East, Asia, and Europe from 1945 to the present. The insights and lessons emerging from these cases and drawn out by Press-Barnathan’s analysis will help scholars and decision-makers to better understand and more skillfully manage transitions to peace in present-day conflicts.

China’s Rise and the Balance of Influence in Asia

China’s Rise and the Balance of Influence in Asia

A multifaceted examination of China in the areas of economics, trade, investment, politics, diplomacy, technology, and security, affording a greater understanding of what relevant policies the United States must develop in the wake of China’s unprecedented growth. This book offers a counterweight to overwrought concerns about the emerging “Chinese threat” and makes the case for viewing China as a force for stability in the twenty-first century.

The American Impasse

The American Impasse

U.S. Domestic and Foreign Policy After the Cold War

For forty years, the political energies of the United States were absorbed by the American-Soviet rivalry. These contributors argue that, with the demise of communism, American politics and policy met the challenge of the new global order with alarming slowness and inflexibility. These essays provide an analytic and rather unflattering snapshot of U.S. foreign policy at a time of rapid change.

The United States and Latin America in the 1980s

The United States and Latin America in the 1980s

This volume offers insights on the state of U.S.-Latin American relations, external debt and capital flows, trade relations, democracy, human rights, migration, and security during the 1980s.

The United States and Cuba

The United States and Cuba

Hegemony and Dependent Development, 1880–1934

From its independence from Spain in 1898 until the 1960s, Cuba was dominated by the political and economic presence of the United States. Benjamin studies this unequal relationship through 1934, by examining U.S. trade, investment, and capital lending; Cuban institutions and social movements; and U.S. foreign policy. Benjamin convincingly argues that U.S. hegemony shaped Cuban internal politics by exploiting the island’s economy, dividing the nationalist movement, co-opting Cuban moderates, and robbing post-1933 leadership of its legitimacy.

My Missions for Revolutionary Bolivia, 1944-1962

My Missions for Revolutionary Bolivia, 1944-1962

Andrade presents a candid insider’s view of U.S.-Bolivian relations which will sometimes make Americans feel proud, and other times ashamed. He describes meetings with Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, and many others.

Progressivism and the Open Door

Progressivism and the Open Door

America and China, 1905–1921

This book examines the formation of U.S. policy toward China during the Progressive Era as the byproduct of two very different domestic policy approaches.

Total 7 results found.