Regional

Total 106 results found.

Chatham Village

Chatham Village

Pittsburgh's Garden City

Angelique Bamberg provides the first book-length study of the community of Chatham Village in Pittsburgh. She establishes its historical significance to urban planning and reveals the complex development process, social significance, and breakthrough construction and landscaping techniques that shaped this idyllic community.

Palace of Culture

Palace of Culture

Andrew Carnegie's Museums and Library in Pittsburgh

The first history of The Carnegie Museums and Library of Pittsburgh, a cultural conglomeration that has served millions of people since its inception in 1895. Gangewere details the political turmoil, budgetary constraints, and cultural tides that have influenced the caretakers and the collections along the way. He provides individual histories of the library, music hall, museums, and science center, and describes the importance of each as an educational and research facility.

Seeking the Greatest Good

Seeking the Greatest Good

The Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot

Char Miller chronicles the history of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation Studies and describes its iconic national historic site, Grey Towers, offered by Pinchot’s family as a lasting gift to the American people. As a union of the United States Forest Service and the Conservation Foundation, the institute was created to formulate policy and develop conservation education programs. Miller explores the institute’s unique fusion of policy makers, scientists, politicians, and activists and their efforts to increase our understanding of and responses to urban and rural forestry, water quality, soil erosion, air pollution, endangered species, land management and planning, and hydraulic fracking.

Green Republican

Green Republican

John Saylor and the Preservation of America's Wilderness

A biography of John P. Saylor, a Republican congressman from Pennsylvania who became a prominent conservationist in the three decades after World War II.

Teenie Harris, Photographer

Teenie Harris, Photographer

Image, Memory, History

Published in cooperation with Carnegie Museum of Art

With an introduction by Deborah Willis

The famous faces of Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Josephine Baker, Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, and John F. Kennedy appear among the nearly eighty thousand photographs of Charles “Teenie” Harris (1908–1998). But it’s in the images of other, ordinary people and neighborhoods that Harris shows us a city and an era teeming with energy, culture, friendship, and family. Harris captured the essence of African American life in Pittsburgh, and his work in Pittsburgh’s Hill District surpasses that of all other photographers in its breadth and rich portrayal of black urban America.

Winner of the 2012 BCALA Literary Award

Killing Time

Killing Time

Leisure and Culture in Southwestern Pennsylvania, 1800–1850

Winner of the 1996 Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award Killing Time examines the cultural history of southwestern Pennsylvania through the lens of leisure activities. Scott Martin details how leisure activities were integral in the formation of class, gender, ethnic, and community identities.

The WPA History of the Negro in Pittsburgh

The WPA History of the Negro in Pittsburgh

The first publication of a reclaimed WPA project studying Pittsburgh’s black population. The book features articles on civil rights, social class, lifestyle, culture, folklore, and institutions, from colonial times through the 1930s.

Where the Evidence Leads

Where the Evidence Leads

An Autobiography, Revised and Updated

Dick Thornburgh, former Governor of Pennsylvania and U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Reagan and Bush, reveals painful details of his personal life, including the 1960 automobile accident that claimed the life of his first wife and permanently disabled his infant son. He presents a frank analysis of the challenges of raising a family as a public figure, and tells the moving story of his personal and political crusade that culminated in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Race and Renaissance

Race and Renaissance

African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II

Race and Renaissance presents the first history of African American life in Pittsburgh after World War II. It examines the origins and significance of the second Great Migration, the persistence of Jim Crow into the postwar years, the second ghetto, the contemporary urban crisis, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and the Million Man and Million Woman marches, among other topics.

The Shadow Of The Mills

The Shadow Of The Mills

Working-Class Families in Pittsburgh, 1870–1907

Choice 1990 Outstanding Academic Book, Shadow of the Mills focuses on the private side of industrialization, on how the mills structured the everyday existence of the women, men, and children who lived in their shadows. Through imaginative use of census data, the records of municipal, charitable, and fraternal organizations, and the voices of workers themselves in local newspapers, S.J. Kleinberg builds a detailed picture of the working-class life cycle: marital relationships, the interaction between parents and children, the education and employment prospects of the young, and the lives if the elderly.

Bethlehem Steel

Bethlehem Steel

Builder and Arsenal of America

Bethlehem Steel presents an original and compelling history of a leading American company, examining the numerous factors contributing to the growth of this titan and those that eventually felled it—along with many of its competitors in the U.S. steel industry.

The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh

The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh

Law, Technology, and Child Labor

An original examination of legislative clashes over the singular issue of the glass house boys, who performed menial tasks, received low wages, and had little to say on their own behalf while toiling in glass bottle plants. Flannery reveals the many societal, economic, and political factors at work that allowed for the perpetuation of child labor in this industry and region.

Pittsburgh A New Portrait

Pittsburgh A New Portrait

Toker examines Pittsburgh in its historical context, in its regional setting, and from the street level (leading the reader on a personal tour through every neighborhood). Based on his 1986 classic, Pittsburgh: An Urban Portrait, but with a completely revised text and lavishly illustrated with all new photos and maps, Pittsburgh: A New Portrait reveals the true colors of a great American city.

Nickelodeon City

Nickelodeon City

Pittsburgh at the Movies, 1905-1929

From the 1905 opening of the wildly popular, eponymous Nickelodeon in the city’s downtown to the outgrowth of nickel theaters in nearly all of its neighborhoods, Pittsburgh proved to be perfect for the movies. Nickelodeon City profiles the major promoters in Pittsburgh, as well as ordinary theater owners, suppliers, and patrons. Aronson examines early film promotion, distribution, and exhibition, and reveals the beginnings of state censorship and the lobbying and manipulation attempted by members of the movie trade.

The Fallingwater Cookbook

The Fallingwater Cookbook

Elsie Henderson's Recipes and Memories

The Fallingwater Cookbook captures the experience of fine and casual dining at this famed home. Suzanne Martinson, former food editor and writer for the Pittsburgh Press and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, relates recipes from Elsie Henderson, the Kaufmann family cook at Fallingwater, along with Henderson’s memories of life at the house. The book also includes recipes from chef Robert Sendall, cooking instructor Jane Citron, and Mary Ann Moreau, former chef of the Fallingwater Cafe, along with photos of food, family, and Fallingwater.

Winner of the Special Jury Award, Gourmand World Cookbook Awards

Total 106 results found.