Literary Criticism / General

Total 58 results found.

Illness as Narrative

Illness as Narrative

While the illness narrative is now a staple of the publishing industry, the genre itself has posed a problem for literary studies. What is the role of criticism in relation to personal accounts of suffering? Can these narratives be judged on aesthetic grounds? Are they a collective expression of the lost intimacy of the patient-doctor relationship? Is their function thus instrumental—to elicit the reader’s empathy?

To answer these questions, Ann Jurecic turns to major works on pain and suffering by Susan Sontag, Elaine Scarry, and Eve Sedgwick and reads these alongside illness narratives by Jean-Dominique Bauby, Reynolds Price, and Anne Fadiman, among others. In the process, she defines the subgenres of risk and pain narratives and explores a range of critical responses guided, alternately, by narrative empathy, the hermeneutics of suspicion, and the practice of reparative reading.

Re-reading Poets

Re-reading Poets

The Life of the Author

Paul Kameen reflects on the life and works of several famous poets. This serves as his foundation to explore a range of critical, intellectual, and cultural issues and to reestablish the value of poetry for everyone.

The Wild Man Within

The Wild Man Within

An Image in Western Thought from the Renaissance to Romanticism

These essays trace the myth of the wild man from the Middle Ages to its disintegration into symbol in the periods following the discovery of America and encounter with real “wild men.” This is the first book to discuss the concept of wildness in the writings of the Enlightenment period in Western Europe.

Making Up Society

Making Up Society

The Novels of George Eliot

Fisher places the work of George Eliot within the great evolution that constitutes the nineteenth-century English novel. He reports not only about her work, but about an evolving complex literary form.

Literature and Subjection

Literature and Subjection

The Economy of Writing and Marginality in Latin America

Legras views the factors that have both formed and stifled the integration of peripheral experiences into Latin American literature. He analyzes key works by novelists Juan Jose Saer (The Witness), Nellie Campobello (Cartucho), Roa Bastos (Son of Man), and Jose Maria Arguedas (The Fox from Up Above and the Fox from Down Below), among others, to provide a theoretical basis for understanding the plight of the author, the peripheral voice, and the confines of the literary medium.

How the Soviet Man Was Unmade

How the Soviet Man Was Unmade

Cultural Fantasy and Male Subjectivity under Stalin

This book exposes the paradox behind the myth of the indestructible Stalinist-era male. In her analysis of social-realist literature and cinema, Kaganovsky examines the recurring theme of the mutilated male body. She views this representation as a thinly veiled statement about the emasculated male condition during the Stalinist era. Kaganovsky provides an insightful reevaluation of classic works of the period, including the novels of Nikolai Ostrovskii (How Steel Was Tempered) and Boris Polevoi (A Story About a Real Man), and films such as Ivan Pyr’ev’s The Party Card, Eduard Pentslin’s The Fighter Pilots, and Mikhail Chiaureli’s The Fall of Berlin, among others. The symbolism of wounding in these works acts as a fissure in the facade of Stalinist cultural production through which we can view the consequences of historic and political trauma.

Other South

Other South

Faulkner, Coloniality, and the Mariátegui Tradition

Other South raises new questions about the scope and attitude of Faulkner’s project, positioning his work as an inherent critique of colonialism and emphasizing a more specific conceptualization of coloniality. Engaging with theorists from the former colonies, Aboul-Ela draws on an understanding of economics, social structures, and the colonial/neocolonial status of the Third World, and steps outside the preconceptions of current postcolonial studies to offer a view of our shared literary heritage.

Nightmares of the Lettered City

Nightmares of the Lettered City

Banditry and Literature in Latin America, 1816-1929

Winner of the 2010 Kayden Book Award for literary studies.

An original study of the popular theme of banditry in works of literature, essays, poetry, and drama, from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s, and banditry’s pivotal role during the conceptualization and formation of the Latin American nation-state. While focusing on four crucial countries (Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, and Venezuela), it is the first book to address the depiction of banditry in Latin America as a whole.

A Sun within a Sun

A Sun within a Sun

The Power and Elegance of Poetry

A sustained reflection on the enterprise of poetry, on what poetry is and might be, that sees poetry as way of life at it most genuine.

American Indian Rhetorics of Survivance

American Indian Rhetorics of Survivance

Word Medicine, Word Magic

The book examines the complex and sophisticated efforts of American Indian writers and orators to constructively engage an often hostile and resistant white audience through language and other symbol systems.

The Avant-Garde and Geopolitics in Latin America

The Avant-Garde and Geopolitics in Latin America

Examines the canonical Latin American avant-garde texts of the 1920s and 1930s, with particular focus on Roberto Arlt and Mario de Andrade. The movement developed on its own terms, in polemic dialogue with European movements, critiquing modernity itself, and developed a geopolitical awareness that bridged postcolonial and postmodern culture and continues its influence today.

The Task of the Interpreter

The Task of the Interpreter

Text, Meaning, and Negotiation

By examining the interpretation of a wide variety of materials, such as works in translation and literary fiction, Pol Vandevelde presents a new approach to interpretation that reconciles the possibility of multiple interpretations with the need to consider an author’s intent.

The Corpus Delicti

The Corpus Delicti

A Manual of Argentine Fictions

An intellectual tour de force from one of today’s leading critics of Latin American literature and culture, The Corpus Delicti [The Body of Crime] is a manual of crime, a compendium of crime tales, and an extended meditation on the role of crime in life.

Rewriting Capitalism

Rewriting Capitalism

Literature and the Market in Late Tsarist Russia and the Kingdom of Poland

Holmgren examines how capitalism in turn-of-the-century Russia and the Kingdom of Poland affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership.

Parlor Radical

Parlor Radical

Rebecca Harding Davis and the Origins of American Social Realism

Rebecca Harding Davis was a prominent author of radical social fiction during the latter half of the nineteenth century. She confronted a wide range of contemporary American issues, giving voice to working women, prostitutes, wives seeking divorce, celibate utopians, and female authors. By engaging current strategies in literary hermeneutics with a strong sense of historical radicalism in the Gilded Age, Jean Pfaelzer reads Davis through the public issues that she forcefully inscribed in her fiction.

Total 58 results found.