History / Latin America / South America

Total 83 results found.

Politics in Uniform

Politics in Uniform

Military Officers and Dictatorship in Brazil, 1960-80

Between 1964 and 1985, Brazil lived under the control of a repressive, anticommunist regime, where generals maintained all power. Despite these circumstances, dozens of young captains, majors, and colonels believed that they too deserved to participate in the exercise of power. For two decades they carried on a clandestine political life that strongly influenced the regime’s evolution. This book tells their story.

Portraits in the Andes

Portraits in the Andes

Photography and Agency, 1900-1950

Coronado examines photography to further the argument that intellectuals grafted their own notions of indigeneity onto their subjects. He looks specifically at the Cuzco School of Photography (active in the southern Andes) through whose work Coronado argues for photography, in its capacity as a visual and technological practice, as a powerful tool for understanding and shaping what modernity meant in the region.

Spectacular Modernity

Spectacular Modernity

Dictatorship, Space, and Visuality in Venezuela, 1948-1958

An analysis of how a decade of military rule in Venezuela produced a dominant ideology of progress so meticulously crafted that to this day audacious Modernist art and architecture and dictatorship are conflated under the term “modernity.”

Making Citizens in Argentina

Making Citizens in Argentina

Making Citizens in Argentina charts the evolving meanings of citizenship in Argentina from the 1880s to the 1980s. Against the backdrop of immigration, science, race, sport, populist rule, and dictatorship, the contributors analyze the power of the Argentine state and other social actors to set the boundaries of citizenship.

The Matter of Empire

The Matter of Empire

Metaphysics and Mining in Colonial Peru

This book examines the philosophical principles invoked by apologists of the Spanish empire that laid the foundations for the exploitation of the Andean region between 1520 and 1640. Orlando Bentancor ties the colonizers’ attempts to justify the abuses wrought on the environment and the indigenous population to their larger ideology concerning mining, science, and the empire’s rightful place in the global sphere. To Bentancor, their presuppositions were a major turning point for colonial expansion and paved the way to global mercantilism.

Inca Garcilaso and Contemporary World-Making

Inca Garcilaso and Contemporary World-Making

This edited volume offers new perspectives on the important work of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (1539-1616), one of the first Latin American writers to present an intellectual analysis of pre-Columbian history and culture and the ensuing colonial period. To the contributors, Inca Garcilaso presented an early counter-hegemonic discourse and a reframing of the history of native cultures that undermined the colonial rhetoric of his time and the geopolitical divisions it purported.

Slave Emancipation and Transformations in Brazilian Political Citizenship

Slave Emancipation and Transformations in Brazilian Political Citizenship

Castilho offers original perspectives on the political upheaval surrounding the process of slave emancipation in postcolonial Brazil. He shows how the abolition debates in Pernambuco transformed the practices of political citizenship and marked the first instance of a mass national political mobilization.

For a Proper Home

For a Proper Home

Housing Rights in the Margins of Urban Chile, 1960-2010

Winner, 2016 Southern Cone Studies Section Social Sciences Book Award, Latin American Studies Association

This book examines the dramatic forms of social mobilization, state-directed repression, mass development projects, and socioeconomic exclusion that have marked struggles over low-income urban housing in Santiago, Chile, during the past half-century.

Resource Extraction and Protest in Peru

Resource Extraction and Protest in Peru

In this groundbreaking study, Moises Arce exposes a long-standing climate of popular contention in Peru. Looking beneath the surface to the subnational, regional, and local level as inception points, he rigorously dissects the political conditions that set the stage for protest. Focusing on natural resource extraction and its key role in the political economy of Peru and other developing countries, Arce reveals a wide disparity in the incidence, forms, and consequences of collective action.

The Metamorphosis of Heads

The Metamorphosis of Heads

Textual Struggles, Education, and Land in the Andes

Provides a comprehensive ethnography of writing in the Andes, and details the relationship between Andean peoples’ struggle to preserve their indigenous textual forms in the face of Western cirricula, with their struggle for land and power.

Acting Inca

Acting Inca

National Belonging in Early Twentieth-Century Bolivia

In this groundbreaking study, E. Gabrielle Kuenzli revisits the events of the Bolivian civil war and its aftermath during the early twentieth-century, to dispel popular myths about the Aymara and reveal their forgotten role in the nation-building project of modern Bolivia.

Race and the Chilean Miracle

Race and the Chilean Miracle

Neoliberalism, Democracy, and Indigenous Rights

Race and the Chilean Miracle examines conflicts between Mapuche indigenous people and state and private actors over natural resources, territorial claims, and collective rights in the Araucania region. Through ground-level fieldwork, extensive interviews with local Mapuche and Chileans, and analysis of contemporary race and governance theory, Richards exposes the ways that local, regional, and transnational realities are shaped by systemic racism in the context of neoliberal multiculturalism. Her compelling analysis offers new perspectives on indigenous rights, race, and neoliberal multiculturalism in Latin America and globally.

Honorable Mention, Society for the Study of Social Problem’s 2014 Global Division Book Award

Afterlives of Confinement

Afterlives of Confinement

Spatial Transitions in Postdictatorship Latin America

Susana Draper uses the phenomenon of the “opening” of prisons to begin a dialog on conceptualizations of democracy and freedom in postdictatorship Latin America. Focusing on the Southern Cone nations of Uruguay, Chile, and Argentina, she examines key works in architecture, film, and literature to peel away the veiled continuity of dictatorial power structures in ensuing consumer cultures.

Transformations and Crisis of Liberalism in Argentina, 1930–1955

Transformations and Crisis of Liberalism in Argentina, 1930–1955

Jorge Nallim chronicles the decline of liberalism in Argentina during the volatile period between two military coups—the 1930 overthrow of Hip—lito Yrigoyen and the deposing of Juan Per—n in 1955. Nallim documents a wide range of locations where liberalism was claimed and ultimately marginalized in the pursuit of individual agendas. He demonstrates how liberalism became a vital and complex factor in the metamorphosis of modern history in Argentina and Latin America as well.

Gender, State, and Medicine in Highland Ecuador

Gender, State, and Medicine in Highland Ecuador

Modernizing Women, Modernizing the State, 1895-1950

Kim Clark relates the stories of women who successfully challenged Ecuadorian state programs in the wake of the Liberal Revolution of 1895. New laws left loopholes wherein women could contest entry into education systems, certain professions, and vote in elections. These women became modernizers and agents of change, winning freedoms for themselves and future generations.

Total 83 results found.