History / Latin America / South America

Total 83 results found.

Transition Cinema

Transition Cinema

Political Filmmaking and the Argentine Left since 1968

Transition Cinema documents the critical role filmmakers, the film industry, and state regulators played in Argentina’s volatile and unfinished transition from dictatorship to democracy. Jessia Stites Mor shows how, during periods of both military repression and civilian rule, the state moved to control political film production and its content, distribution, and exhibition. She also reveals the strategies that the industry, independent filmmakers, and film activists employed to comply with or circumvent these regulations.

Bound Lives

Bound Lives

Africans, Indians, and the Making of Race in Colonial Peru

Bound Lives chronicles the lived experience of race relations in northern coastal Peru during the colonial era. Rachel Sarah O’Toole examines how Andeans and Africans negotiated and employed casta, and in doing so, constructed these racial categories. This study highlights the tenuous interactions of colonial authorities, indigenous communities, and enslaved populations and shows how the interplay between colonial law and daily practice shaped the nature of colonialism and slavery.

Winner of the 2013 Perœ Flora Tristan Prize from the Peru Section of theLatin American Studies Association

Salt and the Colombian State

Salt and the Colombian State

Local Society and Regional Monopoly in Boyaca, 1821-1900

In republican Colombia, salt became an important source of revenue not just to individuals, but to the state, which levied taxes on it and in some cases controlled and profited from its production. Focusing his study on the town of La Salina, Joshua M. Rosenthal presents a fascinating glimpse into the workings of the early Colombian state, its institutions, and their interactions with local citizens during this formative period.

Highland Indians and the State in Modern Ecuador

Highland Indians and the State in Modern Ecuador

This volume chronicles the changing forms of indigenous engagement with the Ecuadorian state since the early nineteenth century that grew into the strongest unified indigenous movement in Latin America. Nine case studies examine how indigenous peoples have attempted to claim control over state formation in order to improve their position in society. It concludes with four comparative essays that place indigenous organizational strategies in Ecuador within a larger Latin American historical context.

City at the Center of the World

City at the Center of the World

Space, History, and Modernity in Quito

In this original cultural history, Ernesto Capello analyzes the formation of memory, myth, and modernity through the eyes of Quito’s diverse populations. By employing Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept of chronotopes, Capello views the configuration of time and space in narratives that defined Quito’s identity and its place in the world. To Capello, these tropes began to crystallize at the end of the nineteenth century, serving as a tool for distinct groups who laid claim to history for economic or political gain during the upheavals of modernism.

Dignifying Argentina

Dignifying Argentina

Peronism, Citizenship, and Mass Consumption

During their term, Juan and Eva Per—n (1946-1955) led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. In Dignifying Argentina, Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh perspective by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. He argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society.

Winner of the 2013 Book Prize in the Social Sciences awarded by the Southern Cone Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association.

The Vigorous Core of Our Nationality

The Vigorous Core of Our Nationality

Race and Regional Identity in Northeastern Brazil

Explores conceptualizations of regional identity and a distinct population group known as nordestinos in northeastern Brazil during a crucial historical period. Beginning with the abolition of slavery and ending with the demise of the Estado Novo under Getœlio Vargas, Stanley E. Blake offers original perspectives on the paradoxical concept of the nordestino and the importance of these debates to the process of state and nation building.

Sentencing Canudos

Sentencing Canudos

Subalternity in the Backlands of Brazil

In the late nineteenth century, the Brazilian army staged several campaigns against the settlement of Canudos in northeastern Brazil. The colony’s residents followed Antonio Conselheiro, who promoted a communal existence free from taxes and oppression. Estimates of the death toll range from fifteen thousand to thirty thousand. Sentencing Canudos offers an original perspective on the hegemonic intellectual discourse surrounding this event. In her study, Johnson views the process of nation building and the silencing of “other” voices through the reinvisioning of history. Looking primarily to Euclides da Cunha’s Os Sert›es, she maintains that the events and people of Canudos have been “sentenced” to history by this work.

Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru

Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru

Population Growth and the Bourbon Reforms

An original study examining the primacy placed on physicians and medical care to generate population growth and increase the workforce during the late eigteenth century in colonial Peru.

I Sweat the Flavor of Tin

I Sweat the Flavor of Tin

Labor Activism in Early Twentieth-Century Bolivia

A study of the rise of Bolivian tin miners into a politically active labor movement during the early twentieth century, and their eventual challenge to the oligarchy controlling the nation.

Electing Chavez

Electing Chavez

The Business of Anti-neoliberal Politics in Venezuela

Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez was the first anti-neoliberal presidential candidate to win in the region. Electing Chavez examines the circumstances that facilitated this pivotal election. Gates examines how Chavez won over voters and even obtained the secret allegiance of a group of business “elite outliers,” with a reinterpretation of the relationship between business and the state during Venezuela’s era of two-party dominance.

The Politics of Motherhood

The Politics of Motherhood

Maternity and Women's Rights in Twentieth-Century Chile

Examines the negotiations over women’s rights and the politics of gender in Chile throughout the twentieth century. Centering her study on motherhood, Pieper Mooney explores dramatic changes in health policy, population paradigms, and understandings of human rights, and reveals that motherhood is hardly a private matter defined only by individual women or couples. Instead, it is intimately tied to public policies and political competitions on nation-state and international levels.

The Andes Imagined

The Andes Imagined

Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity

Repositions Peruvian indigenismo as a discourse of and about modernity, in which the movement’s artists and intellectuals used the figure of the Indian to mobilize larger questions about becoming modern.

Literature and Subjection

Literature and Subjection

The Economy of Writing and Marginality in Latin America

Legras views the factors that have both formed and stifled the integration of peripheral experiences into Latin American literature. He analyzes key works by novelists Juan Jose Saer (The Witness), Nellie Campobello (Cartucho), Roa Bastos (Son of Man), and Jose Maria Arguedas (The Fox from Up Above and the Fox from Down Below), among others, to provide a theoretical basis for understanding the plight of the author, the peripheral voice, and the confines of the literary medium.

Piety, Power, and Politics

Piety, Power, and Politics

Religion and Nation Formation in Guatemala, 1821–1871

Douglass Sullivan-Gonzalez examines the influence of religion on the development of nationalism in Guatemala during the period 1821-1871, focusing on the relationship between Rafael Carrera and the Guatemalan Catholic Church. He illustrates the peculiar and fascinating blend of religious fervor, popular power, and caudillo politics that inspired a multi-ethnic and multiclass alliance to defend the Guatemalan nation in the mid-nineteenth century.

Total 83 results found.