History / Europe / Russia & the Former Soviet Union

Total 81 results found.

Stalinist Confessions

Stalinist Confessions

Messianism and Terror at the Leningrad Communist University

A study of the Great Purge in the setting of Leningrad Communist University, seen in the rhetoric of the accused and their accusors.

After Hitler, Before Stalin

After Hitler, Before Stalin

Catholics, Communists, and Democrats in Slovakia, 1945–1948

Examines the crucial postwar period in Slovakia, following Nazi occupation and ending with the Communist coup of February 1948. Centered on the major political role of the Catholic Church and its leaders, it offers a fascinating study of the interrelationship of Slovak Catholics, Democrats, and Communists. Felak views Communist policies toward Catholics and their strategies to court Catholic voters, and he chronicles the variety of political stances Catholics maintained during Slovakia’s political turmoil.

Brezhnev’s Folly

Brezhnev’s Folly

The Building of BAM and Late Soviet Socialism

The first scholarly account of BAM (the Baikal-Amur Railway), Russia’s most ambitious public construction project to be attempted in the final decades leading up to the collapse of the USSR. This is a rich social history based on a combination of original scholarly research and interviews with many of those who worked on BAM.

How the Soviet Man Was Unmade

How the Soviet Man Was Unmade

Cultural Fantasy and Male Subjectivity under Stalin

This book exposes the paradox behind the myth of the indestructible Stalinist-era male. In her analysis of social-realist literature and cinema, Kaganovsky examines the recurring theme of the mutilated male body. She views this representation as a thinly veiled statement about the emasculated male condition during the Stalinist era. Kaganovsky provides an insightful reevaluation of classic works of the period, including the novels of Nikolai Ostrovskii (How Steel Was Tempered) and Boris Polevoi (A Story About a Real Man), and films such as Ivan Pyr’ev’s The Party Card, Eduard Pentslin’s The Fighter Pilots, and Mikhail Chiaureli’s The Fall of Berlin, among others. The symbolism of wounding in these works acts as a fissure in the facade of Stalinist cultural production through which we can view the consequences of historic and political trauma.

Bandits and Partisans

Bandits and Partisans

The Antonov Movement in the Russian Civil War

In 1920, Aleksandr Antonov led an insurgency that became the largest armed peasant revolt against the Soviets during the civil war. Yet by 1921, the revolt had been crushed, and popular support for the movement had all but disappeared. Until now, details of this conflict have remained hidden. Erik Landis mines recently opened provincial and central Soviet archives and international collections to provide a depth of detail and historical analysis never before possible in this definitive account of the uprising.

The Archaeology of Anxiety

The Archaeology of Anxiety

The Russian Silver Age and its Legacy

The “Silver Age” (c. 1890-1917) has been one of the most intensely studied topics in Russian literary studies, and for years scholars have struggled with its precise definition. Firmly established in the Russian cultural psyche, it continues to influence both literature and mass media. Rylkova analyzes writings by Anna Akhmatova, Vladimir Nabokov, Boris Pasternak and Victor Erofeev to reveal how the construct of the Silver Age was perpetuated and ingrained.

Intimate Enemies

Intimate Enemies

Demonizing the Bolshevik Opposition, 1918-1928

Intimate Enemies examines the transformation of Bolshevik Party ideology, language, and power relations during the crucial period leading up to Stalin’s seizure of power. Igal Halfin uncovers this evolution in the language of Bolshevism. This language defined the methods for judging true party loyalty-in what Halfin describes as an examination of the ‘hermeneutics of the soul,’ and became the basis for prosecuting the Party’s enemies, particularly the “intimate enemies” within the Party itself.

Nature and National Identity After Communism

Nature and National Identity After Communism

Globalizing the Ethnoscape

Winner of the 2008 First Place/Book Prizefrom the Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies

Examines the intersection of environmental politics, globalization, and national identity in post-Soviet Latvia. Views the country’s responses to European assistance and political pressure in nature management, biodiversity conservation, and rural development.

The End of Peasantry?

The End of Peasantry?

The Disintegration of Rural Russia

Examines the dramatic recent decline of agriculture in post-Soviet Russia and the historic, technological, and geographic contributing factors. Views current agricultural reform programs that will profoundly impact the political and economic stability of Russia.

Red Atom

Red Atom

Russias Nuclear Power Program From Stalin To Today

Reveals the history and death of the Soviet Union’s peaceful use of nuclear power through exploration of both the projects and the technocratic and political elite who were dedicated to increasing state power through technology. Paul Josephson illuminates the problems that can befall any society heavily invested in large-scale technology.

Writing the Siege of Leningrad

Writing the Siege of Leningrad

Womens Diaries Memoirs and Documentary Prose

Writing the Siege of Leningrad tells of women’s experiences keeping the city alive and functioning during the 900 day Siege of Leningrad. Utilizing the words and descriptions of these women, Cynthia Simmons and Nina Perlina tell the story of a previously overlooked section of the population.

Inventing a Soviet Countryside

Inventing a Soviet Countryside

State Power and the Transformation of Rural Russia, 1917–1929

A balanced, thorough examination of the political, social, and cultural aspects of the Bolsheviks’ efforts to modernize the Russian peasantry.

Curative Powers

Curative Powers

Medicine and Empire in Stalin’s Central Asia

Curative Powers combines post-colonial theory with ethnographic research to reconstruct how the Soviet government used medicine and public health policy to transform the society, politics, and culture of its outlying regions, specifically Kazakhstan.

Winner of the 2003 Heldt Prize from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies.

Exile and Identity

Exile and Identity

Polish Women in the Soviet Union during World War II

Katherine Jolluck tells the story of thousands of Polish women exiled to the Soviet Union in 1939-41, and examines the ways in which their efforts to maintain their identities as respectable women and patriotic Poles helped them survive.

Celebrating Women

Celebrating Women

Gender Festival Culture & Bolshevik Ideology 1910-1939

Choi Chatterjee analyzes both Bolshevik attitudes towards women and the invented state rituals surrounding Women’s Day to demonstrate the ways these celebrations helped construct gender notions in the Soviet Union.

Total 81 results found.