Political Science / American Government / Legislative Branch

Total 6 results found.

Arlen Specter

Arlen Specter

Scandals, Conspiracies, and Crisis in Focus

An Historical Tapestry of Controversies, Risks, Mistakes, Victories, and Defeats through Arlen Specter’s Long Career

Between The Branches

Between The Branches

The White House Office of Legislative Affairs

Because of the power-fearing drafters of the U.S. Constitution, presidents have had to look beyond the formal powers of the office to influence Congress and push a legislative agenda. In Between the Branches, a book of unprecedented depth, Kenneth Collier traces the evolution of the methods the White House has developed to influence Congress over nine adminstrations, from Eisenhower to Clinton.

Strategic Disagreement

Strategic Disagreement

Stalemate in American Politics

Although compromise is an inherent part of politics, many politicians chose not to adjust their goals for fear of losing supporters or a strong debate position. It is the strategies of these office holders that John Gilmour describes in Strategic Disagreement, illuminating lost opportunities to pass important legislation resulting from such disagreements.

Dead Laws for Dead Men

Dead Laws for Dead Men

The Politics of Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Legislation

This account of the struggle for coal mine health and safety legislation in the U.S. examines the series of laws that steadily expanded the role of the federal government from the late 1800s through the 1980s. Curran concludes that federal legislation has done little to improve change conditions in the coal mines.

The Political Failure of Employment Policy, 1945–1982

The Political Failure of Employment Policy, 1945–1982

This book follows the impact of economic ideas and opinions on federal employment policy from the 1946 Employment Act to the Job Training Partnership Act of 1982. Among many factors, Mucciaroni traces policy failures to the fact that labor and management were not centrally involved in making policy, and employment programs lacked a stable and organized constituency committed to their success. Additionally, employment programs were not integrated with economic policy, were hampered by conflicting objectives, and were difficult to carry out effectively.

Congress Oversees the Bureaucracy

Congress Oversees the Bureaucracy

Congressional supervision of the way the executive implements legislative mandates-“oversight” of the bureaucracy-is one of the most complex and least understood functions of Congress. In this book, Morris Ogul clarifies the meaning of oversight and analyzes the elements that contribute to its success or neglect.

Total 6 results found.