History / United States / 20th Century

Total 27 results found.

Harry, Tom, and Father Rice

Harry, Tom, and Father Rice

Accusation and Betrayal in America's Cold War

Centered around mostly ordinary people, Harry, Tom, and Father Rice relates the story of the author’s uncle Harry Davenport, union leader Tom Quinn, and Father Charles Owen Rice to the great conflict between anti-Communist and Communist forces in the American labor movement.

Conversations With Maida Springer

Conversations With Maida Springer

A Personal History Of Labor, Race, and International Relations

In this brilliantly edited collection of personal interviews, Maida Springer, one of the twentieth-century’s most fascinating international labor leaders and powerful African-American women, tells her story in her own words.

Conservation And The Gospel Of Efficiency

Conservation And The Gospel Of Efficiency

The Progressive Conservation Movement, 1890–1920

Written almost half a century ago, this book offers an invaluable history of the conservation movement’s origins, and provides an excellent context for understanding contemporary enviromental problems and possible solutions. This book defines two conflicting political processes: the demand for an integrated, controlled development guided by an elite group of scientists and technicians and the demand for a looser system allowing grassroots impulses to have a voice through elected representatives.

American Mosaic

American Mosaic

The Immigrant Experience in the Words of Those Who Lived It

American Mosaic presents the recollections of 140 immigrants from six continents and fifty countries who have settled all across the United States.

The American Steel Industry, 1850–1970

The American Steel Industry, 1850–1970

A Geographical Interpretation

A richly detailed account of the American steel industry from its beginnings until 1970, when its long period of international leadership was challenged, this book interprets steel from the viewpoints of historical and economic geography. It considers both physical factors, such as resources, and human factors such as market, organization, and governmental policy.

Steelmasters and Labor Reform, 1886-1923

Steelmasters and Labor Reform, 1886-1923

Gerald G. Eggert provides a fascinating inside view of top steel officials arguing their positions on various labor reforms—stock purchase plans, employer liability, employee representation, and elimination of the twelve-hour shift and seven-day work week, during the late eighteen and early nineteenth century.

The Emergence of a UAW Local, 1936–1939

The Emergence of a UAW Local, 1936–1939

A Study in Class and Culture

This book is a firsthand account of the experience of unionization in personal and social terms. Freidlander describes the transformation of a working-class community by its own actions and the ensuing stratification within that union.

Toward a National Power Policy

Toward a National Power Policy

The New Deal and the Electric Utility Industry, 1933–1941

This book profiles the events, laws, utilities and dominant industry and political players that shaped the development of national power policies during a period when the federal government sought to make affordable electricity available to all Americans.

Heir to Empire

Heir to Empire

United States Economic Diplomacy, 1916-1923

Parrini examines the evolution of United States economic diplomacy during a critical period in world history—after World War I.

American Railroad Politics, 1914–1920

American Railroad Politics, 1914–1920

Rates, Wages and Efficiency

This book describes the crucial World War I period, when the federal government assumed control of the railroads, and various interest groups fought for their positions with policy makers.

The Progressives and the Slums

The Progressives and the Slums

Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890-1917

A detailed study of housing reform at the turn of the twentieth century, focusing on the tenements of New York City and the work of Lawrence Veiller, the dominant figure in Progressive Era housing reform.

Presidential Delegation of Authority in Wartime

Presidential Delegation of Authority in Wartime

Administration in time of war has come to revolve around the President, and much of the administrative authority of the President is then delegated to extralegal agents. Grundstein’s analysis of the experiences of World War I show that such delegation is inevitable.

Total 27 results found.