Poetry / General

Total 264 results found.

Iconoscope

Iconoscope

New and Selected Poems

Collected here are poems from Peter Oresick’s previous books, beginning with The Story of Glass (1977), and to them are added 36 new poems called Under the Carpathians. His work—known for working class and Catholic themes—probes labor and social history, post-World War II America, Eastern European identity, Eastern Rite Catholicism, and Russian icons and fine art and especially Pittsburgh-born pop art icon Andy Warhol.

Matters of the Sea / Cosas del mar

Matters of the Sea / Cosas del mar

A Poem Commemorating a New Era in US-Cuba Relations

Matters of the Sea / Cosas del mar is a commemorative bilingual chapbook that beautifully reproduces Richard Blanco’s stirring poem presented during the historic reopening ceremony of the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba, on August 14, 2015.

Matters of the Sea is one of the most emotionally complex and personal poems I’ve ever written, invested with all my love for the people of two countries that are part of my very being. As with the presidential inauguration in 2013, I am once again humbled and honored to participate as a poet in another historic moment of such significance. I’m elated by the power of poetry to mark such important, communal moments, and be a catalyst for change and understanding by reaching deep into our emotional selves and connecting us to our shared humanity.”—Richard Blanco

The Invisible Bridge / El Puente Invisible

The Invisible Bridge / El Puente Invisible

Selected Poems of Circe Maia

A bilingual collection, The Invisible Bridge / El Puente Invisible brings together many of the luminous, deeply philosophical poems of Circe Maia, one of the few living poets left of the generation which brought Latin American writing to world prominence.

For Dear Life

For Dear Life

In For Dear Life, with accessibility, wit, and humor, Ronald Wallace evokes a wide variety of subjects that range from the traditional themes of lyric poetry—love, death, sex, the natural world, marriage, birth, childhood, music, religion, art—to the most unexpected and quirky narratives—an ode to excrement, a catalogue of comic one-liners, a celebratory testimonial to his teeth.

Boy with Thorn

Boy with Thorn

In a landscape at once the brutal American South as it is the brutal mind, Boy with Thorn interrogates the genesis of all poetic creation—the imagination itself, questioning what role it plays in both our fascinations with and repulsion from a national history of racial and sexual violence.

Wild Hundreds

Wild Hundreds

Winner of the 2014 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry PrizeWinner of the 2017 Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers AwardWinner, 2016 BCALA Literary Award, Poetry CategoryFinalist, 2015 NAACP Image Awards, poetry category

Wild Hundreds is a long love song to Chicago. The book celebrates the people, culture, and places often left out of the civic discourse and the travel guides. Wild Hundreds is a book that displays the beauty of black survival and mourns the tragedy of black death.

Karankawa

Karankawa

Winner of the 2014 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry

Winner of the 2106 Society of Midland Authors Literary Award (poetry category)

Karankawa is a collection that explores some of the ways in which we (re)construct our personal histories. Rich in family narratives, myths, and creation stories, these are poems that investigate passage—dying, coming out, transforming, being born—as well as the gaps that also reside in our stories, for, as Rocha suggests, the opportunity to create myths is provided by great silences.

Interstate

Interstate

Interstate is a collection of lyrical poems in four sections that concentrate thematically on animals, love and sex, compassion, and loss.

The Nerve Of It

The Nerve Of It

Poems New and Selected

Winner of the 2016 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets

Emanuel’s version of a “new and selected poems” turns convention on its head. She ignores chronology, placing new poems beside old, mixing middle and early poems with recent work, and liberating all her poems from the restraints of their particular histories, both aesthetic and autobiographical.

The State of the Art

The State of the Art

A Chronicle of American Poetry, 1988-2014

This book collects all twenty-nine forewords from The Best American Poetry series. Beginning with a new introduction by David Lehman and a foreword by poet Denise Duhamel (guest editor for The Best American Poetry 2013), the collection conveys a sense of American poetry in the making, year by year, over the course of a quarter of a century.

Brain Camp

Brain Camp

Brain Camp explores with clarity and vividness a wide spectrum of emotions—love to hate, tenderness to brutality—all from a perspective both universal yet distinctly Webb’s. Metaphors of startling aptness and originality, a voice at once endearing and provocative, high musicality, propulsive energy, wild imaginative leaps, as well as a mastery of diction from lyricism to street-speak, create a reading experience of the first order.

The Republics

The Republics

Winner, 2016 George Ellenbogen Poetry Award from the Arab American National Museum

The Republics is a massively brilliant new work, a leap in literature we have not seen. It’s gripping, harrowing, and at times horrific while its form paradoxically is fresh, luscious, and original. Bypassing pity and transforming pain into language Handal stars. She has recorded like Alice Walker, Paul Celan, John Hershey, and Carolyn Forche some of the worst civilization has offered humankind and somehow made it art.”—Sapphire

More Money than God

More Money than God

Michelson’s poems explore the boundaries between the personal and the political, and the connections between history and memory. Growing up under the shadow of the Holocaust, in a Brooklyn neighborhood consumed with racial strife, Michelson’s experiences were far from ordinary. His sense of humor and acute awareness of Jewish history, with its ancient emphasis on the fundamental worth of human existence make this accessible book, finally, celebratory and life-affirming.

Do Not Rise

Do Not Rise

“Beth Bachmann’sTemperwas the last time [in forty years] I remember reading a first book by a poet so prodigally and—the word that came to my mind was—severelygifted. The new poems inDo Not Rise are a quantum leap forward with all the metaphorical leaps, adumbrations, dizzyings, deft, brief knottings that make the poems inTemperso dazzling.A remarkable young talent, and a scary one.”—Robert Hass

Loose Strife

Loose Strife

In poems initially inspired by Aeschylus’ fifth-century B.C. trilogy “The Oresteia,” which chronicles the fall of the House of Atreides, Loose Strife investigates the classical sense of loose strife, namely “to loose battle” or “sow chaos,” a concept which is still very much with us more than twenty-five hundred years later.

Total 264 results found.