Books

Total 1532 results found.

Monastery for the Ibex, A

Monastery for the Ibex, A

Conservation, State, and Conflict on the Gran Paradiso, 1919-1949

The First Detailed History of Italy’s Gran Paradiso National Park Under Fascist Rule

Cuban Studies 50

Cuban Studies 50

The Preminent Journal for Scholarly Work on Contemporary Cuba

The Correspondence of John Tyndall, Volume 8

The Correspondence of John Tyndall, Volume 8

The Correspondence, June 1862-January 1865

Public Disputes, Tyndall’s Dramatic Mountain Climbing Escapades, Efforts to Promote Science to a Wide Audience, and More

The City as Photographic Text

The City as Photographic Text

Urban Documentary Photography of São Paulo

A Showcase that Reveals Photography as an Important but Understudied Latin American Cultural Genre

Literacy as Conversation

Literacy as Conversation

Learning Networks in Urban and Rural Communities

A Hopeful Approach to the Problem of Literacy Among Communities in Need

Coastal Metropolis

Coastal Metropolis

Environmental Histories of Modern New York City

An Interdisciplinary Overview of New York City’s Relationship with Its Waterways and Coastlines Since 1889

Compound Remedies

Compound Remedies

Galenic Pharmacy from the Ancient Mediterranean to New Spain

A Unique History of the Galenic Pharmaceutical Tradition in New Spain

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Indian scientific achievements in the early twentieth century are well known, with a number of heralded individuals making globally recognized strides in the field of astrophysics. Covering the period from the foundation of the Asiatick Society in 1784 to the establishment of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science in 1876, Sen explores the relationship between Indian astronomers and the colonial British. He shows that from the mid-nineteenth century, Indians were not passive receivers of European knowledge, but active participants in modern scientific observational astronomy.

Recreating Newton

Recreating Newton

Newtonian Biography and the Making of Nineteenth-Century History of Science

Higgitt examines Isaac Newton’s changing legacy during the nineteenth century. She focuses on 1820-1870, a period that saw the creation of the specialized and secularized role of the “scientist.” At the same time, researchers gained better access to Newton’s archives. These were used both by those who wished to undermine the traditional, idealised depiction of scientific genius and those who felt obliged to defend Newtonian hagiography. Higgitt shows how debates about Newton’s character stimulated historical scholarship and led to the development of a new expertise in the history of science.

The Making of British Anthropology, 1813-1871

The Making of British Anthropology, 1813-1871

Victorian anthropology has been derided as an “armchair practice,” distinct from the scientific discipline of the twentieth century. But the observational practices that characterized the study of human diversity developed from the established sciences of natural history, geography and medicine. Sera-Shriar argues that anthropology at this time went through a process of innovation which built on scientifically grounded observational study. Far from being an evolutionary dead end, nineteenth-century anthropology laid the foundations for the field-based science of anthropology today.

The Medical Trade Catalogue in Britain, 1870-1914

The Medical Trade Catalogue in Britain, 1870-1914

By the late nineteenth century, advances in medical knowledge, technology and pharmaceuticals led to the development of a thriving commercial industry. The medical trade catalogue became one of the most important means of promoting the latest tools and techniques to practitioners. Drawing on over 400 catalogues produced between 1870 and 1914, Jones presents a study of the changing nature of medical professionalism. She examines the use of the catalogue in connecting the previously separate worlds of medicine and commerce and discusses its importance to the study of print history more widely.

The Making of Modern Anthrax, 1875-1920

The Making of Modern Anthrax, 1875-1920

Uniting Local, National and Global Histories of Disease

From the mid-nineteenth century onwards a number of previously unknown conditions were recorded in both animals and humans. Known by a variety of names, and found in diverse locations, by the end of the century these diseases were united under the banner of “anthrax.” Stark offers a fresh perspective on the history of infectious disease. He examines anthrax in terms of local, national and global significance, and constructs a narrative that spans public, professional and geographic domains.

Popular Exhibitions, Science and Showmanship, 1840-1910

Popular Exhibitions, Science and Showmanship, 1840-1910

Victorian culture was characterized by a proliferation of shows and exhibitions. These were encouraged by the development of new sciences and technologies, together with changes in transportation, education and leisure patterns. The essays in this collection look at exhibitions and their influence in terms of location, technology and ideology.

The Age of Scientific Naturalism

The Age of Scientific Naturalism

Tyndall and His Contemporaries

Physicist John Tyndall and his contemporaries were at the forefront of developing the cosmology of scientific naturalism during the Victorian period. They rejected all but physical laws as having any impact on the operations of human life and the universe. Contributors focus on the way Tyndall and his correspondents developed their ideas through letters, periodicals and scientific journals and challenge previously held assumptions about who gained authority, and how they attained and defended their position within the scientific community.

Uncommon Contexts: Encounters between Science and Literature, 1800-1914

Uncommon Contexts: Encounters between Science and Literature, 1800-1914

Britain in the long nineteenth century developed an increasing interest in science of all kinds. Whilst poets and novelists took inspiration from technical and scientific innovations, those directly engaged in these new disciplines relied on literary techniques to communicate their discoveries to a wider audience. The essays in this collection uncover this symbiotic relationship between literature and science, at the same time bridging the disciplinary gulf between the history of science and literary studies. Specific case studies include the engineering language used by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the role of physiology in the development of the sensation novel and how mass communication made people lonely.

Total 1532 results found.