History / Latin America / South America

Total 84 results found.

Conscript Nation

Conscript Nation

Coercion and Citizenship in the Bolivian Barracks
Military service in Bolivia has long been compulsory for young men. This service plays an important role in defining identity, citizenship, masculinity, state formation, and civil-military relations in twentieth-century Bolivia. The project of obligatory military service originated as part of an attempt to restrict the power of indigenous communities after ...
Defiant Geographies

Defiant Geographies

Race and Urban Space in 1920s Rio de Janeiro
Defiant Geographies examines the destruction of a poor community in the center of Rio de Janeiro to make way for the country’s first international mega-event. As the country celebrated the centenary of its independence, its post-abolition whitening ideology took on material form in the urban development project that staged ...
Seventh Heaven

Seventh Heaven

Travels through Jewish Latin America

Stavans’s Ongoing Quest to Find a Convergence Between the Personal and Historical

Destape

Destape

Sex, Democracy, and Freedom in Postdictatorial Argentina

The First History of the Destape as a Large-Scale Media Phenomenon and Transformative Force in Sexual Ideologies and Practices

The Dictator Dilemma

The Dictator Dilemma

The United States and Paraguay in the Cold War

The Story of US Relations with the Stroessner Dictatorship

Improvised Cities

Improvised Cities

Architecture, Urbanization, and Innovation in Peru

The History of Aided Self-Help Housing in Peru

Politics in Uniform

Politics in Uniform

Military Officers and Dictatorship in Brazil, 1960-80

Between 1964 and 1985, Brazil lived under the control of a repressive, anticommunist regime, where generals maintained all power. Despite these circumstances, dozens of young captains, majors, and colonels believed that they too deserved to participate in the exercise of power. For two decades they carried on a clandestine political life that strongly influenced the regime’s evolution. This book tells their story.

Portraits in the Andes

Portraits in the Andes

Photography and Agency, 1900-1950

Coronado examines photography to further the argument that intellectuals grafted their own notions of indigeneity onto their subjects. He looks specifically at the Cuzco School of Photography (active in the southern Andes) through whose work Coronado argues for photography, in its capacity as a visual and technological practice, as a powerful tool for understanding and shaping what modernity meant in the region.

Spectacular Modernity

Spectacular Modernity

Dictatorship, Space, and Visuality in Venezuela, 1948-1958

An analysis of how a decade of military rule in Venezuela produced a dominant ideology of progress so meticulously crafted that to this day audacious Modernist art and architecture and dictatorship are conflated under the term “modernity.”

Making Citizens in Argentina

Making Citizens in Argentina

Making Citizens in Argentina charts the evolving meanings of citizenship in Argentina from the 1880s to the 1980s. Against the backdrop of immigration, science, race, sport, populist rule, and dictatorship, the contributors analyze the power of the Argentine state and other social actors to set the boundaries of citizenship.

The Matter of Empire

The Matter of Empire

Metaphysics and Mining in Colonial Peru

This book examines the philosophical principles invoked by apologists of the Spanish empire that laid the foundations for the exploitation of the Andean region between 1520 and 1640. Orlando Bentancor ties the colonizers’ attempts to justify the abuses wrought on the environment and the indigenous population to their larger ideology concerning mining, science, and the empire’s rightful place in the global sphere. To Bentancor, their presuppositions were a major turning point for colonial expansion and paved the way to global mercantilism.

Inca Garcilaso and Contemporary World-Making

Inca Garcilaso and Contemporary World-Making

This edited volume offers new perspectives on the important work of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (1539-1616), one of the first Latin American writers to present an intellectual analysis of pre-Columbian history and culture and the ensuing colonial period. To the contributors, Inca Garcilaso presented an early counter-hegemonic discourse and a reframing of the history of native cultures that undermined the colonial rhetoric of his time and the geopolitical divisions it purported.

Slave Emancipation and Transformations in Brazilian Political Citizenship

Slave Emancipation and Transformations in Brazilian Political Citizenship

Castilho offers original perspectives on the political upheaval surrounding the process of slave emancipation in postcolonial Brazil. He shows how the abolition debates in Pernambuco transformed the practices of political citizenship and marked the first instance of a mass national political mobilization.

For a Proper Home

For a Proper Home

Housing Rights in the Margins of Urban Chile, 1960-2010

Winner, 2016 Southern Cone Studies Section Social Sciences Book Award, Latin American Studies Association

This book examines the dramatic forms of social mobilization, state-directed repression, mass development projects, and socioeconomic exclusion that have marked struggles over low-income urban housing in Santiago, Chile, during the past half-century.

Resource Extraction and Protest in Peru

Resource Extraction and Protest in Peru

In this groundbreaking study, Moises Arce exposes a long-standing climate of popular contention in Peru. Looking beneath the surface to the subnational, regional, and local level as inception points, he rigorously dissects the political conditions that set the stage for protest. Focusing on natural resource extraction and its key role in the political economy of Peru and other developing countries, Arce reveals a wide disparity in the incidence, forms, and consequences of collective action.

Total 84 results found.