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University Press Week 2019: How to Be a (Better) Global Citizen

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University Press Week 2019: How to Be a (Better) Global Citizen

Welcome to the University Press Week 2019 Blog Tour! University presses across the county will be sharing articles, interviews, and excerpts from titles that relate to various sub-themes of the main UP Week theme: Read. Think. Act. Today’s posts are all on “How to be a (better) global citizen.” Check out these posts from our university press friends: “How to Cope with Polarization” by Amitai Etzioni, University of Virginia Press * * * “The Impact of a Monograph: ‘A Woman without a Husband Is Like a Fish without a Bicycle’” by Nancy Wingfield, Purdue University Press * * * “#READUP on…

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Painting the Future: Chesley Bonestell and Catherine Newell’s New Book, <i>Destined for the Stars</i>

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Painting the Future: Chesley Bonestell and Catherine Newell’s New Book, Destined for the Stars

In Destined for the Stars: Faith, the Future, and America’s Final Frontier, author Catherine L. Newell explores what drove the United States to rapidly expand its space exploration plans—in particular, she looks at the roles of religious faith and mankind’s desire to explore new frontiers. By “recasting the space race as an inherently spiritual endeavor, Newell exposes and explains the origins of the language of ‘divine destiny’—which imbues much of the modern talk of visiting other planets today” (Publishers Weekly). One of the major players in Destined for the Stars is Chesley Bonestell (1888–1986), whose astronomical art was extremely influential…

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Q&A with <i>American Dinosaur Abroad</i> author Ilja Nieuwland

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Q&A with American Dinosaur Abroad author Ilja Nieuwland

Ilja Nieuwland is the author of American Dinosaur Abroad: A Cultural History of Carnegie’s Plaster Diplodocus. He is a historian of science–in particular paleontology–attached to the Huygens Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam. American Dinosaur Abroad covers the discovery in 1899 of the Diplodocus carnegii—or Dippy, as it’s known today—by a team of paleontologists sponsored by Andrew Carnegie. Then the longest and largest dinosaur on record, the Diplodocus skeleton was replicated into plaster casts that were gifted to different nations by Carnegie in the years leading up to World War I. In this largely untold history, Nieuwland…

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A Portrait of Middle-Class Family Life: The Spencers of Pittsburgh’s Shadyside

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A Portrait of Middle-Class Family Life: The Spencers of Pittsburgh’s Shadyside

Ethel Spencer, the third daughter of the seven Spencer children born between 1884 and 1895, was a curious and observant child. She wrote her childhood memoir in 1959 while she was professor at Carnegie Tech (today’s Carnegie Mellon University). It served as a memento of the joy-filled years she shared with her brothers and sisters in Pittsburgh’s affluent Shadyside neighborhood. The Spencers of Amberson Avenue, later published by the University of Pittsburgh Press in 1983, explores the family of Charles Hart Spencer, an employee of Henry Clay Frick, and his wife Mary Acheson from the viewpoint of young Ethel. Through the eyes of Ethel, the reader is…

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Wisconsin author’s debut short fiction collection wins 2019 Drue Heinz Literature Prize

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Wisconsin author’s debut short fiction collection wins 2019 Drue Heinz Literature Prize

Kate Wisel of Monona, Wisconsin, is the 2019 winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, one of the nation’s most prestigious awards for a book of short stories. Her manuscript Driving in Cars with Homeless Men was selected by National Book Award finalist Min Jin Lee from a field of over 530 entries. Driving in Cars with Homeless Men will be published by the University of Pittsburgh Press later this year. “You can hear the crackle of heat and the roar of a powerful fire burning through these pages,” said Lee. “Young angry women, brokenhearted mothers, and men who are…

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