Science / History

Total 119 results found.

The Gray Zones of Medicine

The Gray Zones of Medicine

Healers and History in Latin America

A Relatable, Complex Examination of the History of Health and Healing in Latin America across Five Centuries

The Trinity Circle

The Trinity Circle

Anxiety, Intelligence, and Knowledge Creation in Nineteenth-Century England

Sheds New Light on the Stakes in the Conflict between Religion and the Sciences in the Age of Revolution and Reform

Victorian Science and Imagery

Victorian Science and Imagery

Representation and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture

An Argument for Art and Science as Practices and Knowledges that Emerge from Shared Epistemologies Rather than Compartmentalized Disciplines

Creativity from the Periphery

Creativity from the Periphery

Trading Zones of Scientific Exchange in Colonial India

Presents A New Way of Looking at Peripheral Scientists and Demonstrates Their Creativity and Impact on the Larger Scientific Community

Far Beyond the Moon

Far Beyond the Moon

A History of Life Support Systems in the Space Age

An Engaging History of the Less Glamorous but Equally Essential Aspects of Space Travel: Sanitation, Food Supply, and Waste Disposal

Explorations in the Icy North

Explorations in the Icy North

How Travel Narratives Shaped Arctic Science in the Nineteenth Century

Reconsidering the Distinction between Scientific Discovery and Travel Writing in International Arctic Explorations

Nature’s Diplomats

Nature’s Diplomats

Science, Internationalism, and Preservation, 1920-1960

A History of Early International Preservationist Groups and the Natures They Sought to Preserve

A Tale of Two Viruses

A Tale of Two Viruses

Parallels in the Research Trajectories of Tumor and Bacterial Viruses

The First Study of Medical Virology to Compare the History of Bacteriophages and Sarcoma Agents, Two Distinct but Equally Important Groups of Viruses

The Correspondence of John Tyndall, Volume 8

The Correspondence of John Tyndall, Volume 8

The Correspondence, June 1862-January 1865

Public Disputes, Tyndall’s Dramatic Mountain Climbing Escapades, Efforts to Promote Science to a Wide Audience, and More

Communities of Science in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Communities of Science in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

The nineteenth century was an important period for both the proliferation of “popular” science and for the demarcation of a group of professionals that we now term scientists. Of course for Ireland, largely in contrast to the rest of Britain, the prominence of Catholicism posed various philosophical questions regarding research.

Adelman’s study examines the practical educational impact of the growth of science in these communities, and the impact of this on the country’s economy; the role of museums and exhibitions in spreading scientific knowledge; and the role that science had to play in Ireland’s turbulent political context.

Adelman challenges historians to reassess the relationship between science and society, showing that the unique situation in Victorian Ireland can nonetheless have important implications for wider European interpretations of the development of this relationship during a period of significant change.

Typhoid in Uppingham

Typhoid in Uppingham

Analysis of a Victorian Town and School in Crisis, 1875–1877

After the Public Heath Acts of 1872 and 1875, British local authorities bore statutory obligations to carry out sanitary improvements. Richardson explores public health strategy and central-local government relations during the mid-nineteenth-century, using the experience of Uppingham, England, as a micro-historical case study. Uppingham is a small (and unusually well-documented) market town which contains a boarding school. Despite legal changes enforcing sanitary reform, the town was hit three times by typhoid in 1875-1876.

Science and Eccentricity

Science and Eccentricity

Collecting, Writing and Performing Science for Early Nineteenth-Century Audiences

The concept of eccentricity was central to how people in the nineteenth century understood their world. This monograph is the first scholarly history of eccentricity. Carroll explores how discourses of eccentricity were established to make sense of individuals who did not seem to fit within an increasingly organized social and economic order. She focuses on the self-taught natural philosopher William Martin, the fossilist Thomas Hawkins and the taxidermist Charles Waterton.

Science and Societies in Frankfurt am Main

Science and Societies in Frankfurt am Main

The nineteenth century saw science move from being the preserve of a small learned elite to a dominant force which influenced society as a whole. Sakurai presents a study of how scientific societies affected the social and political life of a city. As it did not have a university or a centralized government, Frankfurt am Main is an ideal case study of how scientific associations—funded by private patronage for the good of the local populace—became an important centre for natural history.

Styles of Reasoning in the British Life Sciences

Styles of Reasoning in the British Life Sciences

Shared Assumptions, 1820–1858

Elwick explores how the concept of “compound individuality” brought together life scientists working in pre-Darwinian London. Scientists conducting research in comparative anatomy, physiology, cellular microscopy, embryology and the neurosciences repeatedly stated that plants and animals were compounds of smaller independent units. Discussion of a “bodily economy” was widespread. But by 1860, the most flamboyant discussions of compound individuality had come to an end in Britain. Elwick relates the growth and decline of questions about compound individuality to wider nineteenth-century debates about research standards and causality. He uses specific technical case studies to address overarching themes of reason and scientific method.

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Indian scientific achievements in the early twentieth century are well known, with a number of heralded individuals making globally recognized strides in the field of astrophysics. Covering the period from the foundation of the Asiatick Society in 1784 to the establishment of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science in 1876, Sen explores the relationship between Indian astronomers and the colonial British. He shows that from the mid-nineteenth century, Indians were not passive receivers of European knowledge, but active participants in modern scientific observational astronomy.

Total 119 results found.