History / Europe / Russia & the Former Soviet Union

Total 82 results found.

Russia in the German Global Imaginary

Russia in the German Global Imaginary

Imperial Visions and Utopian Desires, 1905-1941

This book traces transformations in German views of Russia in the first half of the twentieth century, leading up to the disastrous German invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941. James E. Casteel shows how Russia figured in the imperial visions and utopian desires of a variety of Germans, and illuminates the ambiguous position that Russia occupied in Germans’ global imaginary as both an imperial rival and an object of German power.

Socialist Fun

Socialist Fun

Youth, Consumption, and State-Sponsored Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1945–1970

Most narratives depict Soviet Cold War cultural activities and youth groups as drab and dreary, militant and politicized. In this study, Gleb Tsipursky challenges these stereotypes in a revealing portrayal of Soviet youth and state-sponsored popular culture. He provides a fresh and original examination of the Kremlin’s paramount effort to shape young lives, consumption, popular culture, and to build an emotional community—all against the backdrop of Cold War struggles to win hearts and minds both at home and abroad.

White Spots—Black Spots

White Spots—Black Spots

Difficult Matters in Polish-Russian Relations, 1918–2008

This pioneering study, prepared by the officially sanctioned Polish-Russian Group on Difficult Matters, is a comprehensive effort to document and fully disclose the major conflicts and interrelations between the two nations from 1918 to 2008. This is the English translation of this major study, which has received acclaim for its Polish and Russian editions. The chapters offer parallel histories by prominent Polish and Russian scholars who recount each country’s version of the event in question. Among the topics discussed are the 1920 Polish-Russian war, the origins of World War II and the notorious Hitler-Stalin pact, the infamously shrouded Katyn massacre, the communization of Poland, Cold War relations, the Solidarity movement and martial law, and the renewed relations of contemporary Poland and Russia.

Soviet Space Mythologies

Soviet Space Mythologies

Public Images, Private Memories, and the Making of a Cultural Identity

Soviet Space Mythologies explores the history of the Soviet human space program within a political and cultural context, giving particular attention to the two professional groups—space engineers and cosmonauts—who secretly built and publicly represented the program. Drawing on recent scholarship on memory and identity formation, this book shows how both the myths of Soviet official history and privately circulating counter-myths have served as instruments of collective memory and professional identity.

Between Europe and Asia

Between Europe and Asia

The Origins, Theories, and Legacies of Russian Eurasianism

This book analyzes the origins and development of Eurasianism, an intellectual movement that proclaimed the existence of Eurasia, a separate civilization coinciding with the former Russian Empire. The essays explore the historical roots, the heyday of the movement in the 1920s, and the afterlife of the movement in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods.

Authoritarian Russia

Authoritarian Russia

Analyzing Post-Soviet Regime Changes

Russia today represents one of the major examples of the phenomenon of “electoral authoritarianism,” characterized by adopting the trappings of democratic institutions (such as elections, political parties, and a legislature) and enlisting the service of the country’s essentially authoritarian rulers. Why and how has the electoral authoritarian regime been consolidated in Russia? What are the mechanisms of its maintenance, and what is its likely future course? This book attempts to answer these basic questions.

Crossing Borders

Crossing Borders

Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union

Winner, 2016 Historia Nova Book Prize for best book on Russian Intellectual and Cultural History

Crossing Borders deconstructs contemporary theories of Soviet history from the revolution through the Stalin period, and offers new interpretations based on a transnational perspective. To Michael David-Fox, Soviet history was shaped by interactions across its borders. By reexamining conceptions of modernity, ideology, and cultural transformation, he challenges the polarizing camps of Soviet exceptionalism and shared modernity and instead strives for a theoretical and empirical middle ground as the basis for a creative and richly textured analysis.

The Rise and Fall of Belarusian Nationalism, 1906–1931

The Rise and Fall of Belarusian Nationalism, 1906–1931

Modern Belarusian nationalism emerged in the early twentieth century during a dramatic period that included a mass exodus, multiple occupations, seven years of warfare, and the partition of the Belarusian lands. In this original history, Per Anders Rudling traces the evolution of modern Belarusian nationalism from its origins in late imperial Russia to the early 1930s.

Winner, 2015 Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies from the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES)

Anguish, Anger, and Folkways in Soviet Russia

Anguish, Anger, and Folkways in Soviet Russia

This study offers original perspectives on the politics of everyday life in the Soviet Union by closely examining the coping mechanisms individuals and leaders alike developed as they grappled with the political, social, and intellectual challenges the system presented before and after World War II. As Rittersporn shows, the “little tactics” people employed in their daily lives not only helped them endure the rigors of life during the Stalin and post-Stalin periods but also strongly influenced the system’s development into the Gorbachev and post-Soviet eras.

The Holocaust in the East

The Holocaust in the East

Local Perpetrators and Soviet Responses

This book explores little-known dimensions of the Holocaust on Soviet territory: how the Soviet state and citizens reacted to the annihilation of the Jewish population and how to understand the role of local participants.

Captives of Revolution

Captives of Revolution

The Socialist Revolutionaries and the Bolshevik Dictatorship, 1918–1923

The Socialist Revolutionaries (SRs) were the largest political party in Russia in the crucial revolutionary year of 1917. Heirs to the legacy of the People’s Will movement, the SRs were unabashed proponents of peasant rebellion and revolutionary terror, emphasizing the socialist transformation of the countryside and a democratic system of government as their political goals. They offered a compelling, but still socialist, alternative to the Bolsheviks, yet by the early 1920s their party was shattered and its members were branded as enemies of the revolution. In 1922, the SR leaders became the first fellow socialists to be condemned by the Bolsheviks as “counter-revolutionaries” in the prototypical Soviet show trial. Scott B. Smith presents both a convincing account of the defeat of the SRs and a deeper analysis of the significance of the political dynamics of the Civil War for subsequent Soviet history. Smith reveals a complex and nuanced picture of the postrevolutionary struggle and demonstrates that the Civil War—and in particular the struggle with the SRs—was the formative experience of the Bolshevik party and the Soviet state.

Soviet Mass Festivals, 1917–1991

Soviet Mass Festivals, 1917–1991

Originally published in German, Malte Rolf’s highly acclaimed work examines the creation and perpetuation of large-scale celebrations such as May Day, the anniversary of the October Revolution, Harvest Day, and others throughout the Soviet era. He chronicles the overt political agendas, public displays of power, forced participation, and widespread use of these events in the Soviet drive to eradicate existing cultural norms and replace them with new icons of Soviet ideology. Rolf shows how the new Red Calendar became an essential tool in redefining celebrations in the Soviet Union.

Swans of the Kremlin

Swans of the Kremlin

Ballet and Power in Soviet Russia

A fascinating glimpse at the collision of art and politics during the first fifty years of the Soviet period. Ezrahi shows how the producers and performers of Russia’s two major ballet troupes quietly but effectively resisted Soviet cultural hegemony during this period.

Winner of the 2107 Best Book on Dance published in France (French Edition)

This title is distributed in the U.K. by Dance Books, Ltd.

First Films of the Holocaust

First Films of the Holocaust

Soviet Cinema and the Genocide of the Jews, 1938–1946

Jeremy Hicks presents a pioneering study of Soviet contributions to the growing public awareness of the horrors of Nazi rule. He recovers much of the major film work in Soviet depictions of the Holocaust and views them within their political context, both locally and internationally.

Winner of the 2013 Vucinich Book Prize from ASEEES

Named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 by Choice Magazine

Fascination and Enmity

Fascination and Enmity

Russia and Germany as Entangled Histories, 1914–1945

An original transnational history of Russia and Germany during the critical era of the world wars. By examining the mutual perceptions and misperceptions within each country, the contributors reveal the psyche of the Russian-German dynamic and its use as a powerful political and cultural tool.

Total 82 results found.